Celebrate Pride Month: Every Day by David Levithan

A Book Review Of Every Day By David Levithan Imagine going to bed as a 34-year-old Sicilian-American book blogger, wine enthusiast, and yogi extraordinaire and waking up as a Jonas Brother.  Or, imagine going to bed as a Hillary-loving, tree-hugging, Me Too Movement, carrot-crunching activist who majored in history and understands the Holocaust and waking up as Donald Trump.  Add in some romance, and you pretty much have Every Day by David Levithan.  Well, this comparison is actually a tad shallow.  David Levithan is on a mission to explore humanity at its core whereas I am just thinking up nightmare scenarios. Levithan’s Every Day is the perfect adult and teen read in honor of Pride month. Don’t forget the recent February arrival of Every Day to the big screen, which I still need to see. After my last post on Great LGBT Books for Teens, I had to review another Levithan title.  As Anthony Bourdain was…

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Celebrate Pride Month With 15 LGBTQ Books For Teens

June is Pride Month, and I cannot think of a better way to celebrate than sharing some of my favorite LGBTQ Books For Teens. P.S. I have personally read all of the books on this list and would rate them between three and half and five corks–oops, I mean stars. A Brief Overview of Pride Month What makes June the official month of Pride? On June 28, 1969, police raided the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in Greenwich Village. Tired of being harassed and discriminated against, community members decided to riot and speak up for equal rights. This uprising, known as the Stonewall Riots, led to the Gay Liberation Movement in the United States. Today, as a designated National Monument, the Stonewall Inn represents a catalyst for gay rights and the LGBT movement. There are numerous alliances, coalitions, and parades held across the world. You can find more information from…

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How Not To Write A Book About Race: A Book Review of A Mentor and Her Muse

A Book Review of A Mentor and Her Muse by Susan Sage When offered a free copy for review by both the publisher and independently from the author, A Mentor and Her Muse had a deceptively enticing story. Marketed as a psychological thriller with racial and sexual tensions juxtaposed with the art of writing, I wanted to know more. Unfortunately, not only did the title fall short in interest, but I also found myself sick to my stomach with the poor discussion and depictions of race. Over and over again, I questioned the stereotypes and information provided.  I had not seen many other reviewers bring up issues with the portrayal of black characters in the book—although I saw plenty of less than stellar reviews–so I kept giving A Mentor and Her Muse a chance. Towards the end, a paragraph reinforced that this book has made fatal, tragic flaws. Why I continued…

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