Looking For Great Children’s Books About Disabilities: Check Out Charlie and Frog

Looking for a middle grade children’s detective book with strong male and female characters plus an in tune multicultural edge?  Just released, Charlie and Frog, written by Karen Kane, is one of many strong children’s books about disabilities. This Disney-Hyperion title will inspire and encourage young readers alike to listen with their hearts and embrace everyone in their community. Paired with a suspenseful mystery, follow along with Frog and Charlie as they help to save their older friend Aggie from two scary villains. What secret is Aggie keeping and why do these cinnamon gum-chewing ruffians want it so badly? It All Begins In A Murder Mystery Obsessed Little Town To say that Charlie’s parents are neglectful is a bit of an understatement. Two bathing suits in tow, they leave Charlie in small town, Castle-on-the-Hudson, with his equally apathetic and television-addicted grandparents. What is so important to the Ticklers that they’d…

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Review: Inside Out and Back Again by Thanhha Lai

Based on Lai’s experiences as a 10-year-old girl growing up at the end of the Vietnam War, Hà and her family are forced to leave behind their beloved country full of markets and papaya trees. Heading out on a dangerous sea journey with an uncertain fate, the family is rescued by an American ship. They decide to start over in the United States and are adopted by a generous sponsor in Alabama. Many of the residents of Alabama are less than welcoming, and in diary-like entries written in broken English and verse, Hà chronicles the trials and tribulations of adjusting to America. A slightly heartbreaking story of loss, bullying, family, and adapting, Lai successfully captures and brings to life her own story in this award-winning, historical fiction piece. A Newbery Honor Book and National Book Award Winner for eight to twelve year olds, Inside Out and Back Again is touching and…

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Review: The Best Man by Richard Peck

Kirkus and Booklist named Best Man one of the best books of 2016. Archer Magill begins this story with a wedding that forces him to hide under the porch with his best friend, Lynette. The novel ends with Archer landing the role of best man in another wedding. In between, the story follows Archer and Lynette through elementary school along with Archer’s three wholesome role models: grandpa, his dad, and Uncle Paul. When a new student teacher comes to town, Mr. McLeod, Archer’s world is thrown for a loop—but one that he embraces. Archer is charmingly oblivious for the entire novel, but his innocence makes his growing up all the more powerful. Although this coming of age story follows Archer from first to sixth grade, the content is best for fourth to sixth graders. Reading this book is like eating a bowl of warm, homemade soup with the fireplace blazing…

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Review: A Boy Named Queen by Sara Cassidy

As Evelyn enters 5th grade, cue the arrival of a boy in a pink shirt with eccentric, bohemian, tattooed parents. Queen is my hero as he wears what he wants, builds a force field against bullies, starts his own school clubs, and makes personalized, collage birthday invitations. Evelyn instantly accepts Queen into her world and is rewarded with self-awareness and courage. Reading much like a younger version of Stargirl, A Boy Named Queen addresses what it is like to grow-up and more importantly, grow into one’s skin. This heartwarming realistic fiction novel is suitable for third to sixth graders and left my heart feeling fuzzy. However, as I scrolled through the last page on my iPad, I questioned if half of this eBook failed to download. To say that the story ends abruptly is an understatement, and while this quick read felt more like a short story, I would recommend A Boy Named Queen to any child who…

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