Review: Diary of a Wimpy Kid (Book #1)

Greg’s mom buys him a diary—excuse me, I mean a journal—and he decides to write and draw cartoons of his everyday, middle school life. Greg loves his video games, is always getting into mischief, and he has to deal with his mean older brother, Rodrick, who is destined to humiliate him. Greg bullies around his friend Rowley and finds that he feels jealous and left out as Rowley begins to gain popularity in the tough middle school social scene. We watch as the boys scheme up a profit-making haunted house and roll the world’s biggest snowball to keep trespassers off of their neighborhood hills. A series for reluctant and lower-level readers, Diary of a Wimpy Kid is geared for fifth to eighth graders. Greg is a pretty unlikeable little dude who does mean things much like Eric Cartman in South Park. Whereas South Park has satire and highly intricate plots…

View Post

Miss Klute Is A Hoot (My Weirder School #11)

Some members of this Ella Mentry School class are struggling with reading. Their teacher, Mr. Mackay, decides to introduce the school to Miss Klute, a therapy Labradoodle. Miss Klute is the hit of the school, and all of the students want to read to her. A.J. and his classmates like some reading (they have good taste in Dan Yaccarino), but they especially like to make up their own stories when they get bored. The students worry that Miss Klute is also becoming uninterested and sad. A.J. comes up with a solution to take Miss Klute for a walk. Like A.J.’s usual luck, though, a squirrel runs by and the students lose Miss Klute in the chase. Chaos breaks out at the school and when they find Miss Klute, they have more of a mess than they bargained for. Meant for harder to engage readers, the My Weird School series (and its run…

View Post

Review: Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret

Eleven-year-old Margaret has just moved to New Jersey, and she feels torn between picking a religion. Should she join the Y or the Jewish Community Center? Every day, Margaret talks to God, asking him for favors and advice. With feuding grandparents on each side of the religious debate and non-church going parents, Margaret must figure out who she truly is and what she believes in faith-wise. As if thinking about religion isn’t hard enough, Margaret is also going through puberty. With her clique of friends, she is concerned about her chest size and getting her period. Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret is a clearly defined pre-teen book for third to sixth graders that used to land on many challenged book lists for its sexual offensiveness and amorality. I am sure some readers can laugh at Margaret asking God to please let her get her period while others may be offended that…

View Post